To Serve Mankind











{March 22, 2009}   Sips vs Red Robin

   Our essay assignment for my Eng101 class, due March 14, was an expository essay developed by comparison / contrast.  Since I got an “A”, I am not too embarassed to post my paper here for your reading pleasure!

 

I am a lucky lady; I have two jobs.  One might immediately call to mind the obvious fiscal advantage of two jobs during this country’s depressed economic atmosphere, but the money is not my point.  I have jobs at two very different restaurants, both have their positives and negatives, and this contrast provides me with balance and job satisfaction.  I am endeared to both locations for their dynamic differences, but only the beloved guests know for sure which atmosphere is right for their own purpose or occasion.

Sips Bistro and Wine Shop is a peaceful spot with a maximum guest capacity of 37 people seated.  The tables are odd sized, making it difficult to accommodate a party of over twelve people.  As one enters, the first sight noticed is the wine shop to the right.  It features over 500 labels of wines from around the world.  The feeling is very casual, and guests are prompted to seat themselves at any table in the restaurant.  Any available staff member is happy to approach arriving guests with menus and details of the soup du jour and any specials.

Guests tend to choose from the wine list for their beverage selection, which offers 12 varietals by the six-ounce glass or two-ounce taste.  They can also choose any wine from the shop and we will chill it if necessary and open it for a minimal corkage fee.  As for the food menu, Sips’ guests choose from an unpretentious menu of healthful items.  The plates are not loaded with food, but rather have just enough to compliment the wine and the dining experience.  There are separate menus for lunch and dinner.  All items are made from locally grown and manufactured ingredients whenever possible, and soups and desserts are homemade from scratch.

  After Chef John spent 2 ½ years training at culinary school, he followed his education with high-profile work experience with companies such as Hyatt Regency, The Arizona Diamondbacks, and The Phoenix Suns.  All employees are dedicated professionals with a passion for food and wine.  The owners, Bill and Diane, are oenophiles (wine lovers) and have been for many years.  Bill has been studying and appreciating wine from childhood, and is self-taught in the ways of wine.  Both have traveled abroad on numerous occasions, and Diane has attended many local winery conferences and other assorted culinary classes to hone her food and wine knowledge and skills.  Additionally, Diane’s main love is for the kitchen; her library of homemade recipes keeps the new menu ideas and specials exciting and fun.  Although I do not have the extensive training in food or wine that our Chef and owners possess, I have been active, and learning, in this field for 16 years.

Once the guests’ food order is taken, the order is submitted on a hand-written ticket to the kitchen.  During times of high guest volume, this system of ordering and charging guests can be tedious because we servers manually write the items sold and appropriately corresponding math on the guest tickets.  When all guests are served their beverages and waiting for food, there are a few options for employees to stay busy while waiting to meet further guest needs.  Empty and / or unused dishes are removed from tables.  Water glasses can be refilled.  Dirty dishes can be run through the dishwasher and put away clean.  However, the primary focus is to watch the door for approaching guests.  Cleanliness in front and back is maintained to the best of our abilities, and is usually accomplished, throughout the entire shift.  When the environment is peaceful and quiet, we engage in friendly chit-chat.

As the shift winds down, the restaurant is put back into order for service the next day.  Silverware is rolled into napkins, floors are swept and mopped, and the minimal supply of non-alcoholic beverages is restocked into the reach-in refrigerator.  Diane checks inventory to prepare the next day’s shopping list.  This break-down time is brief and all closing procedures are performed by all staff on hand, except the Chef, who closes his own station promptly after the last plate goes out.  Bill counts the drawer and the day’s receipts after the doors are locked and all guests have left the building.

The Red Robin is another beast altogether.  This restaurant, which includes a full-service bar area called a “Refreshment Center” (RC for short), can accommodate well over 300 guests, from parties of one to thirty or more at the same table.  Upon entering the Red Robin, one is greeted as quickly as possible by a “hospo”, also known as a hostess in other establishments.  If the hospo is not nearby, it is every service employee’s charge to greet and seat incoming guests immediately. 

After, or perhaps even before, noticing the smiling greeter, one can glance around and clearly see the Red Robin’s focus on family-oriented clientele.  Flashing lights and whirring sounds of video and crane games fill the recreation area to the left.  Sights of mixologists (Red Robin’s term for bartender; we are called mixo’s for short) cheerfully shaking milkshakes and mixing martinis to the sounds of overhead music from the 80’s, 90’s, and today, can be seen to the right.  And what is that at your feet?  Yes, a 27” television is embedded into the ground so guests can catch the sports score while waiting to be seated.  The only self-seating tables are found in the RC.

As one walks further back into the main part of the restaurant, further evidence is found of the Red Robin spirit catering to families.  Parents are often to be found chasing crayons that their little ones have thrown to the ground, or tying balloons to their babe’s wrists.  A statue of a Red Robin stands cheerfully in the center of the main restaurant floor.  And if you come at the right time, you may hear a group of team members clapping out a happy birthday chant at some poor, unsuspecting soul.  The staff at Sips would never create such a loud commotion; it would disturb too many people – guests and employees alike!

Unlike Sips, Red Robin has a very limited wine selection.  Only five varietals are available for purchase by the glass or bottle only.  Red Robin does boast a fair selection of eight draft beers, eight bottled beers, and a full bar.  Alcohol sales are not of utmost import at the Red Robin; their popular non-alcoholic beverages are fountain sodas, milkshakes, and their signature Freckled Lemonade.  The same food menu is available from open to close and features over 29 burgers in a myriad of styles and forms.  To the detriment of many, Red Robin offers free refills on baskets of fries, which are automatically included as part of the meal with any burger.  To maintain food consistency among the many Red Robin chain locations, it is policy to obtain all food supplies and ingredients from the same centralized source.

Red Robin cooks may come from other assorted cooking venues, but all are trained consistently in the Red Robin method of burger building and menu item preparation.  They are constantly quizzed on their knowledge of ingredients, food safety, and preparation procedures.  Server training follows the same suit; no matter where one worked previously, Red Robin trains all servers in the Red Robin way to ensure consistency of service.  All are taught to know and follow the Red Robin “Steps of Service” standards, which are a practical and efficient guideline to granting guests optimal service.

In keeping with these steps of service, the server is required to perform tasks within a very specific and brief time frame.  These steps include but are not limited to; greeting the table with information about Red Robin, entering beverage and food orders to the computer in an immediate and accurate fashion, and offering fry refills and the dessert menu / check presenter at specific intervals.  All of this methodical prioritizing is geared at creating a 37 minute table turnaround during lunch hours and a 42 minute table turnaround during dinner.  Guests at the Red Robin tend not to linger, unlike Sips where people may sit for hours over a bottle of wine and talk.

As a shift at Red Robin winds down, servers are phased out as fewer guests walk in the door.  When a server is phased, it is their urgent priority to “break down” their assigned station.  These duties can include rolling silverware, stocking to-go boxes or straws, wiping trays, or refilling salt and pepper shakers.  Closing duties are ideally completed by the time the server’s last table pays its ticket.  When the server’s last ticket is closed, he or she prints an automated report that tells how much cash is owed to Red Robin for the guest tickets transacted.  In the case of the mixo, the same cash due report is generated, but the mixo must count out his or her cash drawer for deposit, as opposed to the personal bank the server carries around.  The back-of-house staff (cooks, dishwasher) begins their breakdown and clean up of the kitchen as early as possible.  This usually occurs as soon as the dinner rush is over.  Back-of-house staff has a lot more detail cleaning to do than the front-of-house staff, so they all stay and work together as a team until cleanup is completed.

Indeed, there are many differences between my beloved places of employment, and I truly appreciate them both for the establishments they are.  I can not choose a favorite.  But for the potential guest seeking a laid-back, mature dining experience without the clapping of birthday songs and wails of fry-deprived children, Sips is the place to be.  On the other hand, if you have youngsters to entertain, a baseball team to buy milkshakes for, or you’re on the road travelling with your family and need a quick in and out dinner, then Red Robin is where you want to visit.  But only you can decide!

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{October 29, 2008}   Nutritional Information

OMG, you guys.  I hope nobody gets mad at me for copy and pasting, but I saw this article at health.yahoo.com  and I had to post it.  True, I work in a chain restaurant and I dish this “crap” out all the time.  But I don’t necessarily condone it…I believe we are all responsible for ourselves and what goes into our pieholes.  So, don’t let’s act too suprised.  Read on, if you dare.  And especially if you love your chain appetizers.

”   A funny thing has happened to America’s restaurant appetizers: They’ve started growing bigger than the meals they prepare us for. It’s now common to wolf down 500 or 600 greasy calories before we even start on our entrees.

One might wonder where all the calories end up. The answer is: our collective belly-fat supplies. The obesity rate stayed constant in only 13 states last year, while the other 37 states saw an increase. This big fat growth — which stretches over 75 percent of America — is due in no small part to our propensity to eat full meals before we eat full meals. (It’s not uncommon anymore to take in two days’ worth of calories in one meal at one of our favorite restaurants.)

To help you wrap your arms around the problem, we’ve gathered the most gluttonous pre-meal binges in America. If this list doesn’t make you hungry, then you’re already ahead of most of us.

CHILI’S
Texas Cheese Fries w/ Jalapeno-Ranch Dressing
2,070 calories
160 g fat (73 g saturated)
3,730 mg sodium
 
Fat Equivalent: Like eating 16 Taco Bell Crunchy Tacos!

After we identified Chili’s Awesome Blossom in our investigative report here on The 20 Worst Foods in America, the chain’s 203 fat grams of deep-fried onion disappeared from the menu. Unfortunately that’s like taking a kiddie shovel to a menu that needs to be cleared with a front loader. The Texas Cheese Fries with jalapeno-ranch dressing has nearly two days’ worth of sodium in this one starter — and nearly four days’ worth of saturated fat.

ON THE BORDER
Grande Fajita Nachos – Mesquite-Grilled Steak
1,970 calories
127 g fat (54 g saturated)
3,780 mg sodium
 
Fat Equivalent: Like eating an entire package of Oreos!

Even if you’re only one of four people working on these nachos, you’ll still bludgeon your belly with half a day’s worth of fat. The same is true for the Border Sampler. Opt instead for the 500-calorie basket of Chips & Salsa.
 
OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE

Aussie Cheese Fries with Ranch
2,030 calories
??? g fat
??? mg sodium
 
Calorie Equivalent: Like eating as many as 21 White Castle Hamburgers!

Consider this one of America’s most questionable appetizers. That’s because Outback doesn’t provide full nutritional data for any of its products, forcing diners to guess exactly how many day’s worth of fat and sodium must really be crammed into this cheesy mess.

Earlier estimates from nutritional analysis groups put the pile at 2,900 calories with close to 200 grams of fat; even with Outback’s more conservative calorie counts, these frightening fries should be avoided at all costs.
 
PIZZA HUT
Taters (full order)
1,580 calories
104 g fat (20 g saturated)
4,160 mg sodium
 
Sodium Equivalent: Like eating more than two full bags of Ruffles Original Potato Chips!

A bag of Ruffles has about 11 servings, which means these tater-tot miscreants carry the heart-taxing sodium load of 22 servings of potato chips. Throw these over your shoulder for good luck; you’ll avoid nearly two days’ worth of sodium that come with this one side. And to discover other salty foods you should steer clear of, check out these 20 foods your cardiologist won’t eat! They’re among America’s worst. 
 
ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL
Romano’s Sampler (fried calamari, fried mozzarella, tomato bruschetta, garnish)
1,640 calories
98 g fat (22 g saturated)
4,000 mg sodium
 
Calorie and Sodium Equivalent: Like eating more than 10 Extra Crispy Drumsticks from KFC!

This sampler is a roundup of the worst offenders on the menu: fried calamari, fried mozzarella, and tomato bruschetta. The only massive calorie bomb they bypass is the 980-calorie Shrimp Artichoke Dip. With a menu as heavy as Macaroni Grill’s, you’d be better off skipping the starters altogether. 
 
RUBY TUESDAY
Grand Sampler (fire wings, southwestern spring rolls, fried mozzarella, and chicken tenders)
1,644 calories
100 g fat
 
Calorie Equivalent: Like eating 5 McDonald’s Cheeseburgers!

There’s enough fried food here to feed an entire Little League baseball team, so unless you’re taking them to Ruby’s (and you have signed permission slips) after the game, I’d recommend avoiding a swing at this bad pitch.
 
T.G.I. FRIDAYS
Jack Daniel’s Sampler (Jack Daniel’s glaze over fried shrimp, Sesame Jack Chicken Strips, and Baby Back Pork Ribs)
2,330 calories
??? g fat
??? mg sodium
 
Calorie Equivalent: Like eating more than 8 Steak Fajita Hot Pockets!

Thanks to new legislation in New York City, chain restaurants were forced to post their calorie counts on their menus. As a result, what Fridays’ patrons discovered was that they’ve been unwittingly paying for a clobbering with a big, greasy fat stick. More than half the appetizers top 1,000 calories. 
 
UNO CHICAGO GRILL
Pizza Skins (full order)
2,400 calories
155 g fat (50 g saturated)
3,600 mg sodium
 
Calorie Equivalent: Like eating a Large Domino’s Hand-Tossed Sausage Pizza!

Would you ever think of saying to a waiter: “Why don’t you start us off with a large meat pizza?” If you’re ordering for a party of more than 5 it might be OK, but for smaller groups, it’s tilting toward gluttony gone wild. Order the Thai Vegetable Pot Stickers instead — the only item carrying fewer than 800 calories.  ”

So, there is more to read if you want to.  All the credit is to David Zinczenko with Matt Goulding and the article title is “The Worst Appetizers in America”.  And, yes, I DO plan to look up nutrition info for the Robin.  This will be interesting…

 

Dedicated to all the crazies ordering a diet cola with your fry fill.

 

Namaste



{October 5, 2008}   What I love about Sips

   Have you seen this place yet? This wine shop is wrapped in a bistro sprinkled with creative variety and adorned by people who are doing what they love to do (except for the paperwork).  And, blissfully, we have guests who I believe we can really call “fans”.  They come back regularly for a variety of reasons.  The perfect portions of food … fresh soups and desserts made from scratch … immense wine experience and information … inimitable personalities; ah, the list goes on.  Being an employee (and unfortunately a rare visitor off-the-clock) I can attest to the fun and sometimes even bizarre dynamic that makes Sips a most comfortable place to enjoy a few hours.

    I first heard about this place in January while flipping thru the Modesto View.  The paper had done a feature on the new shop, which had opened beginning of December ’07.  I was suprised to see the picture of Bill and “some lady”…  I had to call and scope out the situation.  Diane answered and we exchanged pleasantries – I told her I knew Bill from the Wine Shop and BevMo (as do most of our guests) and I told her I was very happy she and Bill had opened this little bistro.  Our town needed this place since the Wine Shop closed down!  I told her I’d be in to dine soon.

     Four months later…I finally made it out to Sips and shame on me for waiting!  I brought my mom-in-law, Linda, for a girl’s lunch.  We fell in love immediately.  With everything.  The ambiance; cozy and inviting with out being pretentious.  The wine shop – a varied selection and I was definitely able to find most of my favorites.  The ceasar salad we split was fresh and zingy.  The grilled chicked sandwich on foccacia we shared was equally delicious, perfectly complimented by the pesto aioli spread.  And then there was the broccoli salad.  This fusion of complimentarily contrasted flavors and textures can hardly be just classified as a broccoli salad – it’s loaded with silky cheddar cheese, chewy dried cranberries, crisp red onion & walnuts, and smoky applewood bacon.  I swear I could eat that salad 3 meals a day!

    I loved the concept, and asked Bill if they needed any servers.  I knew that it would be an immense experience to learn wines from Bill.  And I knew that my days with “the-restaurant-who-shall-not-be-named” made me a perfect candidate to assist in marketing and building Sips’ business wherever Diane would like to use me.  I’m really excited about our potential!

   Whatever reason endears you, please come and come back often to our proud little establishment.  Enjoy the tastes, enjoy the flights; but most of all enjoy yourself.  I look forward to seeing you there!  Tuesday and Wednesday 4-6 is Happy Hour.  I’m there Wednesday and Friday nights, so those are the happiest hours!     http://www.sipsbistro.com

 

 

 

Namaste



{September 18, 2008}   I miss you, too!

   Hello, my friends who keep checking back!  I am sorry to say that I have not been able to complete my most recent post, YET, and I think it’s because I’m thinking too hard.  I just wanted to say thanks for checking up on me and don’t give up on me yet.  Something is stirring… 😉

Sips Bistro

Sips Bistro

 

Namaste



{September 5, 2008}   What you should NEVER do.

The restaurant biz is like any other biz.  There is just some s#!t that you should never try to get away with.  It amazes me sometimes how foolish people can be.  Just because we can and tend to have a lot of fun at work, that is no excuse for a lack of professionalism.  And there is no age discrimination in this topic, either.  Altho the younger, less-experienced staff are more likely to make stupid mistakes, this doesn’t preclude full-grown adults from doing stupid things.  Really stupid things.

1)  Don’t ever show up to your shift drunk or high.  Seriously.  Party time is party time, and work time is work time.  It sucks trying to lead a cook thru a paced meal for a guest and he’s so stoned he can’t remember that you just came in and asked him to fire the main course.  Or trying to break down a bar with a cohort who’s been guzzling and now can’t stay focused.  Which leads me to…

2)  Don’t party with minors.  Duh.  It can be hard to avoid those under 18 / 21 when working in certain restaurants.  We fight the battles together, grow close together; but there needs to be a line of responsibility demarcated by we who know better.  The minors don’t know better.  Of course they want to “play with the big kids” but you’re leading them down a path they don’t need to be on yet.  Party with people your own age.  And not at work.

3)  Managers, don’t get involved with your employees.  And you know what I mean by involved, like having too much “access” to their personal information/situation.  Creating an inappropriate relationship in the workplace is a recipe for disaster.  Even if you’re able to keep it under wraps for a little while, eventually news leaks.  We are a tight community, remember?  Which leads me to…

4)  Leave your attitude and drama at home…or in your car…or at your other job.  I don’t care, just don’t bring it into the workplace where other’s are trying to be positive and successful.  Sometimes it’s hard enough for me to get thru a shift, mentally.  Dealing with guest drama and letting go of one’s own personal issues during a shift consumes enough energy; and it’s not fair for another to pile on their attitude and dramatic situations to another’s situation.  Just zip it, get thru your shift, and take your attitude somewhere else where you can effectively deal with it and not destructively share it with your coworkers.

5)  Don’t diss your team to or in front of guests.  We are a team, and if one falls short we all fall short as we are intrinsically intermingled in each other’s guest service experience.  If you talk smack about the hostess, or the busser, it does reflect back on to you.  And the guests think it’s ok to have a lack of respect for those of us trying to do our job to the best of our ability.  Remember that what comes around goes around.

   I’d love to hear any other “never do’s” that anybody wants to add.  I just may update this post in the near future!

 

 

Namaste



et cetera